David P. Hamilton

  • This book looks at new ways of tackling the problem of separating reaction products from homogeneous catalytic solutions. The new processes involve low leaching supported catalysts, soluble supports such as polymers and dendrimers and unusual solvents such as water, fluorinated organics, ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. The advantages of the different possibilities are discussed alongside suggestions for further research that will be required for commercialisation. Unlike other books, in addition to the chemistry involved, the book looks at the process design that would be required to bring the new approaches to fruition. Comparisons are given with existing processes that have already been successfully applied and examples are given where these approaches are not suitable. The book includes:
    - New processes for the separation of products from solutions containing homogeneous catalysts
    - Catalysts on insoluble or soluble supports - fixed bed catalysts - continuous flow or ultrafiltration
    - Biphasic systems: water - organic, fluorous - organic, ionic liquid - organic, supercritical fluids (monophasic or biphasic with water, organic or ionic liquid)
    - Comparisons with current processes involving atmospheric or low temperature distillation
    - Consideration of Chemistry and Process Design
    - Advantages and disadvantages of each process exposed
    - Consideration of what else is need for commercialisation

  • Lakes across the globe require help.  The Lake Restoration Handbook: A New Zealand Perspective addresses this need through a series of chapters that draw on recent advances in modelling and monitoring tools, citizen science and First Peoples' roles, catchment and lake-focused restoration techniques, and policy implementation. New Zealand lakes, like lakes across the globe, are subject to multiple pressures that have increased in severity and scale as land use has intensified, invasive species have spread and global climate change becomes manifest. This books builds on the popular Lake Managers Handbook (1987), which provided guidance on undertaking investigations into, and understanding lake ecosystems in New Zealand. The Lake Restoration Handbook: A New Zealand Perspective synthesises contemporary issues related to lake restoration and rehabilitation, integrated with social science and cultural viewpoints, and complemented by authoritative topic-area summaries by renowned scientists and practitioners from across the globe. The book examines the progress of lake restoration and the new and emerging tools available to managers for predicting and effecting change. The book will be a valuable resource for natural and social scientists, policy writers, lake managers, and anyone interested in the health of lake ecosystems.

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